Garhwal

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In July 2007 I trekked from Kedarnath to Khatling in Garhwal (India) as part of the 2007 Trans Himalaya Expedition.  We did this trek in the middle of the monsoon in terrible conditions and poor visibility. We didn’t employ the services of a guide; rather we relied on a 90 year old map, Google Earth and a GPS.

The trek turned into an epic adventure as we made up our own version of the route. We were lost in the mist for two days and soon found the map to be totally useless as all the data was made up without any real survey work. How else could a cartographer fail to mark multiple 5000m high peaks on a topographical map?

There was a time when we were standing on a cliff edge in a total white out and driving rain, listening to rocks clatter down into the abyss below us, where we wondered what the hell were we doing. And then there was that bridge which was the engineering equivalent to the shower scene from Psycho.

Route map